Subscribe
On The Town

Sonar's status

Baltimore's renowned warehouse space is shutting its doors.

By Jess Mayhugh | May 4, 2011, 3:30 pm

On The Town

Sonar's status

Baltimore's renowned warehouse space is shutting its doors.

By Jess Mayhugh | May 4, 2011, 3:30 pm

Get Baltimore Daily.

Sign up today and you'll get our latest stories delivered straight to your inbox every weekday afternoon.

Sonar, the giant warehouse space that plays host to national acts and DJs, has announced that it's shutting down, according to its Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Around 4 p.m. today, the venue posted on its Facebook page: "We here at Sonar regret to inform you that we are no longer able to operate as a venue. Mr. Lonnie Fisher, corporate owner of Sonar, has shut the building down. He has refused to renew the liquor license and the corporate charter for 407 Saratoga Inc. All of the money in our account went into paying our taxes with the promise of the license being renewed and transferred to the new owners."

This is sad news for Baltimore entertainment for a multitude of reasons, but mainly because there is really nothing comparable to it in the city. I remember going to Sonar when it first opened on Saratoga Street in 2002, and being shocked and impressed at its size—and the individual atmospheres that each room had—and the venue has only expanded since then. It's rumored that Sonar will be moving its scheduled shows to different venues around town, a a reflection of how the club has always encompassed so many different genres and events all under one roof.

Update: On May 7, Sonar managers updated its Facebook page, saying that the club was reopening. According to the Baltimore Business Journal, the club will remain open, for now, without the bar. However, the staffers insist they are trying to get the liquor license issue resolved. Though some shows have been moved to other venues, Sonar is planning on hosting the Deftones and the Maryland Deathfest.

[Image: courtesy of yelp.com]




Meet The Author
Jess Mayhugh is the digital editor for Baltimore, where she covers nightlife, sports, food, and events.

You May Also Like


MaxSpace

Review: The Disaster Artist

The true—and hilarious—story behind the worst film ever made.

Arts & Culture

Marian Crotty Discusses New Collection What Counts as Love

The Loyola professor talks about the process of collecting short stories for her latest release.

Arts District

Merriweather Season Expected to Resume as Planned Despite Roof Collapse

Executive director of Downtown Columbia Arts and Culture Commission talks resilience of the legendary venue.


Arts District

Walters Curator Says Google Arts App is Good Start But Not Perfect

The museum has more than 1,400 works represented in the app's collection.

MaxSpace

Review: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Tragicomedy has some jarring tonal shifts, but at least gives us a Frances McDormand performance for the ages.

Charmed Life

Designer David Burdick Discusses Costumes in The Revolutionists

Everyman Theatre's resident costume designer talks about his inspiration and creative process.

Connect With Us

Most Read


Baltimore Women’s March Moves Downtown as Thousands Plan to Participate: This year’s theme encourages voter registration in 2018 elections.

Walters Curator Says Google Arts App is Good Start But Not Perfect: The museum has more than 1,400 works represented in the app's collection.

Here’s What We’d Like to See in the New Penn Station: Penn Station Partners will be refreshing the century-old train station.

Ryan’s Daughter Owner Shares Fond Memories Before Closing This Weekend: Marwan Daas and his wife pay tribute to their 14-year-old Irish pub.

Ten Incredibly Easy Ways to Be More Active in 2018: Get creative with walking meetings, workout buddies, and local sports leagues.