Trust Your Gut

Why a healthy gut is more important than you think.

Lauren Bell - December 2018

Trust Your Gut

Why a healthy gut is more important than you think.

Lauren Bell - December 2018


-Danielle Dernoga

Hippocrates once said, “all disease begins in the gut.” And it turns out, he was right. Scientists have started to make the connection between a healthy gut and the impact it can have on whole-body health. When your gut is unbalanced in terms of good and bad bacteria, it can affect not only your digestion, but your immunity, mood, weight, and skin. Cue the rapid production of kombucha, probiotics, and fermented foods, all of which contain that good bacteria. Here are some ways to keep your gut in check.

Examine your diet.
Eating whole grains, vegetables, legumes, and fruits that contain a lot of fiber can promote the growth of beneficial bacteria, as well as increase the feelings of fullness so you do not over eat.

Check for food intolerances.
If you experience bloating, digestion issues, fatigue, or acid reflux, you may have a food intolerance that you aren’t aware of. Try eliminating foods from your diet slowly to see if you notice a positive change in your digestive health.

Lower your stress level.
Chronic stress can be hard on your whole body, including your gut. Lower stress levels by practicing breathing techniques, meditation, and yoga.

Take a probiotic.
Probiotics are live bacteria that are similar to the good bacteria that you already have in your body. They help to support your metabolism, weight management, and your immune system.

Stay hydrated
Drinking enough water helps support your gut in the digestion of soluble fiber and also helps to aid in the balance of good bacteria in the gut.

Incorporate fermented foods
Fermented foods are rich with good bacteria that both benefit your gut and can prevent inflammation. Pass the pickles!

Stay active
Exercising regularly will increase the production of short-chain fatty acids, which help to keep your gut barrier strong and make it harder for unwanted bacteria to grow.





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