Advo-Cats

A Baltimore couple documents—and champions—feral cats.

By Amy Mulvihill - November 2014

Photographers Found Nonprofit for Street Cats

A Baltimore couple documents—and champions—feral cats.

By Amy Mulvihill - November 2014

-Photography by Justin Tsucalas

Feral cats have been part of urban life since humans first established cities—and have been misunderstood for probably just as long. But a Parkville couple is working to change that.

In July 2014, married photographers Elizabeth and Jason Putsche founded a nonprofit, Photographers for Animals, which advocates on behalf of animals via photography and videography projects. One current project is a still-untitled documentary about Baltimore’s wild felines that they hope will correct a few misperceptions.

Contrary to popular belief, says Elizabeth, 34, a lifelong animal lover who has worked for several animal-rescue organizations, the cats are hearty and adaptable, but still face challenges, including some from well-meaning humans.

Because feral cats are essentially wild animals, they are not adoptable, “so when you take them to a shelter, they’re held for the mandatory period, and then they’re killed. So to have cats not go into shelters at all is ideal,” explains Elizabeth.

For this reason, the couple champions the trap-neuter-return method (TNR), in which feral cats are caught, spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and then rereleased.

With their documentary, which they hope to debut in late 2015, the Putsches want to bolster public sentiment by introducing viewers to feral cat caregivers who feed and shelter the animals without making them “pets.”

“There are a lot of people who take care of these cats who you think aren’t being taken care of,” says Jason, 37.

These people often contradict the “crazy cat lady” stereotype, which the couple thinks is an obstacle to TNR acceptance. “There are nurses, law professors, young and old, everyone,” Elizabeth says. “We want to make it more approachable and like a new way to help animals.”





You May Also Like


The Chatter

Former Mayor Catherine Pugh Sentenced to Three Years in Prison

Legal professionals weigh in on the decision and the year-long ‘Healthy Holly’ scandal.

The Chatter

Small Business Owners Greet Drivers on President Street This Week

Group gives out flowers and candy as part of new Love Local Bmore initiative.

The Chatter

Why Is Governor Larry Hogan Meeting with Chris Evans?

The ‘Avengers’ actor met with the governor to pitch a political project.


The Chatter

How Baltimore Officials Are Preparing to Combat Coronavirus

With three cases confirmed in Maryland, medical professionals are taking measures to fight back.

News & Community

The Story Behind Haussner's Massive Ball of String

Waitresses created the 825-pound ball of napkin strings over more than 30 years.

The Chatter

What Will Druid Hill Park Look Like in Two Years?

As Druid Lake Reservoir overhaul continues, city leaders consider activation options.

-Photography by Justin Tsucalas

Connect With Us

Most Read


Maryland Hoops, and Everyone Else, Stomachs A Sudden End to Their Seasons: Plus, an update on Trey Mancini’s health and Joe Flacco shows for Marshal Yanda’s retirement party

Local Boutiques Offer Deals and Online Shopping Amid Coronavirus Outbreak: Opening and closing updates from the retail scene.

With Emptying Venues, Local Music Community Faces Uncertainty: There are still ways to support local artists during the coronavirus outbreak.

How to Support Small Businesses Amid Pandemic Panic: As foot traffic slows due to coronavirus, owners worry about lasting impacts.

What Will Druid Hill Park Look Like in Two Years?: As Druid Lake Reservoir overhaul continues, city leaders consider activation options.