Arts District

​WTMD Celebrates the Human Voice with Embody

This vocal show brings together local talent like Shodekeh, Dan Deacon, Wendel Patrick, and more.

By Jennifer Baik | September 22, 2016, 10:46 am

-Courtesy of WTMD
Arts District

​WTMD Celebrates the Human Voice with Embody

This vocal show brings together local talent like Shodekeh, Dan Deacon, Wendel Patrick, and more.

By Jennifer Baik | September 22, 2016, 10:46 am

-Courtesy of WTMD

Most concerts start with a heady strum of guitar or the clash or bang of drums, but next Tuesday, September 27, WTMD will host a live show of Baltimore musicians with an unlikely twist—no instruments allowed.

A celebration of the human voice, Embody is a long-running series curated by vocal artist and beatboxer Shodekeh. It has previously featured area artists like Victoria Vox, Joyce Scott, and Sam Herring of Future Islands, and the upcoming lineup is no less impressive: local soul sensation Brooks Long, hip-hop artist Wendel Patrick, classically trained soprano Melissa Wimbish, singer-songwriter Ms. Sara, and the ever-popular electronic artist Dan Deacon, among others.

“When Shodekeh and I were putting this lineup together, we wanted to draw from all corners of Baltimore’s music scene,” says Sam Sessa, music coordinator at WTMD. “Baltimore has the best music scene in the country right now, and part of that is because local musicians want to experiment—to push themselves out of their comfort zones. [Embody] presents artists at their most vulnerable, with no instruments, no effects pedals. Just their voices.”

Besides showcasing Baltimore’s best, Shodekeh believes creative vocals show something fundamentally more important than just skill. He sees Embody as a way of connecting people in a deeply creative and personal level.

“The music scene here is pretty segregated,” he says. “But when everybody has access to the same instrument, it's kind of easy to break down those walls.”

Although he intentionally curated a lineup diverse in both style and technique, Shodekeh still believes one of the most important parts is the personal and creative connections made between the artists as well as the audience. The show strives to be interactive—picking out audience members and encouraging impromptu collaborations.

“I think Baltimore is a good place to experiment with context and different contexts, as long as you're mindful of the fusions.” In the future, he hopes to direct an Embody show for Baltimore youth expand, and maybe one day, bring the series to different cities.





You May Also Like


The Chatter

Would Increased TV and Film Production Be Good for Baltimore?

Councilman Leon Pinkett hopes to increase production tax incentives with new resolution.

Arts District

'Wicked' Actress Allison Bailey Talks Bringing Oz to Baltimore

The hit musical returns to the Hippodrome Feb. 12-March 8.

Arts & Culture

Picture This

Grandson of longtime Baltimore Afro-American photographer Henry Phillips preserves his one-of-a-kind collection.


The Chatter

Why Is Governor Larry Hogan Meeting with Chris Evans?

The ‘Avengers’ actor met with the governor to pitch a political project.

MaxSpace

International Intrigue: My 2020 Oscar Predictions

It sure is looking like a showdown between 1917 and Parasite.

Arts & Culture

Music Reviews: February 2020

The latest from Boister and Mary Prankster

Connect With Us

Most Read


Orioles Execs Not Mentioned in ‘AstroGate’ Sign-Stealing Scandal: GM Mike Elias and the O’s other ex-Astros employees have steered clear of the fallout.

Maya Rockeymoore Cummings Declares For Late Husband’s Seat: We break down the familiar faces in upcoming special Democratic primary.

Caleeb Pinkett Screens 'Charm City Kings' at Sundance Film Festival: Producer talks source material, filming in Baltimore, and his famous family.

What to Know About the Maryland Cycling Classic Coming September 2020: For starters, Baltimore's pro cycling event will be more than 100 miles long.

Religious Leaders React to Proposed Increase in Funding to Prevent Hate Crimes: Van Hollen, Sarbanes, and Cardin want to quadruple aid protecting local religious groups.