Gift That Keeps on Giving

For the Greater Goods brings monthly market to Remington.

Lauren Bell - November 2017

Gift That Keeps on Giving

For the Greater Goods brings monthly market to Remington.

Lauren Bell - November 2017

-Side A Photography

Liz Vayda wears a lot of hats: She is the owner of plant retail paradise, B. Willow, and also the front woman of ethereal electronic band Vayda, which recently opened for indie duo Best Coast at the Ottobar. But Vayda is bringing more than just indoor plants and dreamy melodies to the Remington community. Nearly two years ago, she launched For the Greater Goods, a craft market designed to give small businesses and artists in the area a space to sell their goods that also donates a portion of all booth fees to charity. 

“Being able to have an open setting where I could meet people, they could see my work, and we could talk about it was really impactful when developing my business,” Vayda says. “I just wanted to do that for other people.” 

For the Greater Goods started out small, with the first market having only 18 vendors inside Bolton Hill artist collective Dust Town Studios. From there, it gradually grew through social media and word of mouth, moving to Hampden’s Church & Company events space before making R. House in Remington its new home base in May. 

While For the Greater Goods was held more sporadically in the past, R. House is allowing the market to take over its garage space on a Saturday at the beginning of each month, with the first events being held November 4 and December 9, ideal for holiday shopping. The upcoming markets will feature more than 40 vendors—including Drunken Rum Cakes, 3angles, and Pearlswirl jewelry to name a few—with a wide array of handmade goods, food, and accessories. 

“I want to revive the notion of the commons or the town square,” says Vayda. “I think it would be cool to see people coming in month after month to see what’s going on in the community.” 

 And while the exposure is great for the small businesses, the market’s name implies its larger goal. Each month, the market picks a charitable cause, donates a portion of vendors’ booth fees to that organization, and gives the group a free booth to help spread its mission.

“I definitely get a lot of gratification thinking about how, in some way, this is stimulating our local economy and giving Remington another attribute that is different from the new development,” Vayda says. “This creates a sense of pride for small businesses.”





You May Also Like


Home & Living

Basket Case

Baskets are a stylish and clever solution to storage woes.


Style & Shopping

May Days

Send well wishes with these vibrant cards from local shops.


-Side A Photography

Connect With Us

Most Read


Bottoms Up Bagels Rolls Into Harwood: Owners debut their new “BUB Hub” at 28th and Greenmount.

Five Things to Know About Democratic Mayoral Nominee Brandon Scott: The 36-year-old City Council President rallies past Sheila Dixon to win Democratic mayoral primary.

The Womanist Reader Creates an Online Library of Black Literature: A Baltimore writer curates an evolving list of women writers for her women followers.

Amid The Economic Chaos, Downtown Partnership’s New President Has a Plan: Shelonda Stokes was just named president after serving in an interim leadership role.

How These Surprise Quarantine ‘Flower Bombs’ Are Helping Families in Need: The paper-plate flowers have become a massive fundraiser for the Ronald McDonald House.