Book Reviews: March 2018

The latest work from Tom Pelton and Aaron Maybin.

Lauren LaRocca - March 2018

Book Reviews: March 2018

The latest work from Tom Pelton and Aaron Maybin.

Lauren LaRocca - March 2018


2-Book-cover-copy.jpg#asset:58101

The Chesapeake in Focus: Transforming the Natural World

Tom Pelton (Johns Hopkins University Press)

In this book, Pelton, one the country’s leading environmental journalists, offers us a wealth of knowledge about the Chesapeake Bay, collected from his more than two decades of reporting on this ecological, cultural, and historical treasure (you may also know him from his show Environment in Focus on WYPR). His book is part history of the bay’s watershed region, part political history of its preservation, and, to a lesser extent, part personal history, as Pelton draws gorgeous imagery of scenes he’s experienced as an avid kayaker on the bay’s waters and tributaries. In total, he paints a compelling portrait of what it is he wants to preserve. Divided into four sections (The Waters, The People, The Wildlife, and The Policies), the book covers a lot of ground, from Baltimore’s sewage issues to the over-harvesting of wild oysters. The highlight, perhaps, comes toward the end, when Pelton proposes 10 realistic steps for bay restoration. We should listen to him.


Aaron-Maybin.jpg#asset:58102

Art-Activism: The Revolutionary Art, Poetry, & Reflections of Aaron Maybin

Aaron Maybin (self-published)

Some may know him as a former NFL linebacker. Others know him as an arts educator and activist. In his debut book, Baltimore’s Aaron Maybin combines his artwork—paintings, drawings, and photography—with his poetry and short essays, which are gritty and raw but also vibrant with an almost palpable energy. The works serve as Baltimore-centric meditations on what it means to be an activist, and Maybin’s voice is both vulnerable and strong as a black man born and raised here. He quickly moves from politics to religion to class to race, not only acknowledging current problems faced by local African Americans but also offering solutions and alternatives for a brighter future through grassroots efforts. Portions of the book act as anthems for a community that is rising up to meet the challenges they face, so that their children and children’s children might one day live in a better world.





You May Also Like


MaxSpace

Movie Review: Little Women

In the hands of Greta Gerwig and her wonderful cast, the classic feels fresh.

MaxSpace

Movie Review: A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

Tom Hanks as Mr. Rogers is exactly what we all need right now.

Arts & Culture

Dan Deacon Makes the City’s Next Great Masterpiece

We talk with the electronic musician about fear, friendship, and his mindful new album.


Arts & Culture

Book Reviews: December 2019

The latest from Judith Krummeck, Donald Ray Schwartz, and Steven Evans

The Chatter

Catonsville Businesses Embrace Arts and Entertainment District Distinction

Historic neighborhood is the first in Baltimore County to be honored with official state designation.

MaxSpace

Movie Review: 1917

Old-fashioned war film is thrilling and beautiful, if a little corny.

Connect With Us

Most Read


Four Key Updates on the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra: Here’s what the BSO has been up to since performances resumed in September.

Maryland Politicians React to Trump Impeachment: Local leaders reflect and look ahead at Senate trial.

Will Judge Make an Example Out of Catherine Pugh?: With the former mayor’s sentencing scheduled for February, both sides get to work on their case.

Meet the Ravens’ 25-Year-Old, Number-Crunching Whiz Who Has John Harbaugh’s Ear: Park School alum Daniel Stern helps call the game-changing shots for his hometown team.

Maryland Native Maggie Rogers Receives First Grammy Nomination: The singer-songwriter was nominated for “Best New Artist” alongside big-name acts.