Music Reviews: February 2019

The latest from Maggie Rogers and Marian McLaughlin.

Lydia Woolever - February 2019

Music Reviews: February 2019

The latest from Maggie Rogers and Marian McLaughlin.

Lydia Woolever - February 2019


MaggieArt.jpg#asset:70902

Heard It In A Past Life

Maggie Rogers

What a wild few years it’s been for Maggie Rogers. By now you’ve likely heard the story: the young Eastern Shore musician sings a song for Pharrell Williams during her college music class, the video goes viral, and in two short years, the singer-songwriter has turns turned into a bona fide folk-pop star, nabbing a Capitol Records deal, performing on Saturday Night Live, and selling out every stop on her U.S. tour. But what’s lost in that narrative is Rogers’ own true talent, and mighty potential, as showcased on this first full-length album. With big anthems, barebones ballads, and buoyant dance numbers—including that fateful “Alaska”—these 12 songs are a testament and a time capsule, capturing the elusive, ephemeral, earthshaking transformation that took place as her dreams became reality. On each track, she embraces the change, rediscovers herself, and emerges newly potent and powerful, ready for the road ahead. We see no horizon in sight.


Marian.png#asset:70904

Lake Accotink

Marian McLaughlin

If you’ve found yourself overwhelmed by the world recently (haven’t we all?), this Marian McLaughlin record is for you. The local singer-songwriter has crafted a tome of chamber-folk songs to honor the natural cycles of the environment, and each experimental arrangement is a petition to unplug, to be present, and to observe the world around you. Unfurling in a stream of consciousness, McLaughlin’s lilting, labyrinthine verses speak to the relationship between humanity and nature and serve as a way for the artist—and listener—to process our impact on the planet. But through ballads, dirges, and outright epic poetry, her poetic meditations maintain a sense of hope for the future, found in the balance of regeneration and the belief in nature’s omniscience. Give it a listen, then get off your phone, and get outside.





You May Also Like



Arts & Culture

By The Book

Pigtown welcomes Charm City Books to the neighborhood.

Arts & Culture

Cameo: Bonnie Hoppa

We talk to the new executive director of The Book Thing.


Arts & Culture

Music Reviews: October 2019

The latest from Joy Postell and Emma White.

Arts District

Center Stage's 'Thoughts of a Colored Man' Explores Nuances of Black Masculine Identity

Playwright Keenan Scott II shares his inspiration for the piece running through November 10.

Arts District

The Baltimore School for the Arts To Perform Pop-Up Concerts Across the City

For one day only, students will bring free music to multiple neighborhoods in honor of the school’s 40th anniversary.

Connect With Us

Most Read


What to Know About the Maryland Cycling Classic Coming September 2020: For starters, Baltimore's pro cycling event will be more than 100 miles long.

Miller Steps Down as Maryland Senate President; Baltimore's Bill Ferguson Tapped to Succeed: Longest serving Senate president in state history has been battling cancer.

Scenes from Congressman Cummings’ Funeral at New Psalmist Baptist Church: Mourners share memories of the Baltimore leader and civil rights advocate.

John Waters is the Newest Male Face of Nike: Waters is one of three celebrities chosen to be in '90s-inspired Nordstrom x Nike campaign.

The Orioles Aren’t Moving Out of Town, But They Have a Long Way To Go: Putting a wrap on relocation rumors and the O’s predictable 2019 season.