Music Reviews: May 2019

The latest from Micah E. Wood and Cris Jacobs.

Lydia Woolever - May 2019

Music Reviews: May 2019

The latest from Micah E. Wood and Cris Jacobs.

Lydia Woolever - May 2019


MAY-2019-MUSIC-REVIEWS-MICAH-ART.jpg#asset:116439

Micah E. Wood

Micah E. Wood (self-released)

In a world of bravado and swagger, Micah E. Wood’s unapologetically heart-on-his-sleeve music is a breath of fresh air. As with his past two releases, the local musician and photographer bares it all on this third record, examining and embracing his feelings—the highs and lows and everything in-between. In fact, this album, fittingly self-titled, as it might be his most soul-baring yet, is a cathartic rollercoaster of emotion. In contrast to his bright, pop-fueled See Me from 2017, these tracks are more mercurial, meticulous, and effectively mighty. He asks hard questions, of himself, mostly, and others. He pushes past comfort zones. He gets pissed off. In the end, he finds a clearing, full of newfound confidence and inner peace. That same sense of discovery imbues his sound as well, with electronic beats mingling with bold instrumentation, plus lush harmonies and lofty backup vocals that we especially loved. Come for “Summertime,” perhaps our favorite song by the artist yet. Stay for the Beatles-esque crescendo of “New Dude” and the poignant piano ballad of “The Truth.”


MAY-2019-MUSIC-REVIEWS-CRIS-JACOBS-ART.jpg#asset:116440

Cris Jacobs

Color Where You Are (Blue Rose Music)

The King of Baltimore rock ‘n’ roll is back, but he’s not the same man he used to be. In fact, in the three years since the release of his last record, Dust To Gold, Cris Jacobs has become a father, as well as a road warrior, touring and performing extensively as his star rises, even alongside some of his idols. All that change is reflected in this new record—a triumphant feat that fulfills our hunger, in these heavy times, for hope and authenticity. It’s tried-and-true Jacobs to the core, but these 10 songs also rip his soulful sound wide open and lay down fresh terrain. They’re an unbridled amalgam of his many influences—blues, roots, country, soul, bluegrass, funk—fueled by flurries of piano, virile guitar, and powerful vocals. Wavering between big, bright ballads and downright grooves, the veteran musician digs deep and looks ahead. Through thoughtful songwriting, he wrestles with themes of family, fame, and growing older, finding solace in these strange times and success on his own terms.

See our full interview with musician Cris Jacobs.





You May Also Like


Arts & Culture

The Banksy of Baltimore

Reed Bmore has built a local following for his thought-provoking wire sculptures.

Arts & Culture

Music Reviews: June 2019

The latest from Abdu Ali and Kotic Couture.

The Chatter

A Month Before Woodstock, Led Zeppelin and The Guess Who Rocked the Laurel Pop Festival

Fifty years ago, music’s biggest names shared a stage in Laurel.


On The Town

Drag Performances That Showcase Baltimore's Crop of Crazy-Talented Queens

Support the local drag scene at these recurring brunches, dinners, bingo nights, and shows.

MaxSpace

Movie Review: Late Night

The combination of Mindy Kaling and Emma Thompson proves to be unstoppable.

Arts & Culture

Book Reviews: July 2019

The latest from Barbara Bourland and Laura Lippman

Connect With Us

Most Read


Larder Chef Helena del Pesco Talks Intersection Between Food and Art: Trading San Francisco Bay for the Chesapeake Bay, the chef makes her mark in Old Goucher.

The Banksy of Baltimore: Reed Bmore has built a local following for his thought-provoking wire sculptures.

Eyes of the Law: In new book, former undercover cop Jim Cabezas details his career fighting corruption and blindness.

Movie Review: Yesterday: British fantasy is perfectly diverting, but barely scratches the surface of its intriguing premise.

Baltimore Water Taxi Looks Toward the Future: Three years into being a Sagamore Ventures enterprise, the service is working on increasing visibility, riders, and its reach.