Brand New

City neighborhoods embrace branding through public art.

By Amy Mulvihill - February 2016

Brand New

City neighborhoods embrace branding through public art.

By Amy Mulvihill - February 2016

Clockwise from left: Katey Truhn, Mark Washington, Jessie Unterhalter, and Michael Hart. -Photography by Mitro Hood

When asked to name local neighborhoods, Baltimore Highlands and Coldstream Homestead Montebello may not spring to mind.

But that could change as these ’hoods—and others—harness the power of public art to both brand and beautify. There’s the just-completed 30-foot-tall aluminum “R” sculpture in Remington by artist (and resident) Dominic Terlizzi. Or, in Baltimore Highlands, an East Baltimore neighborhood with a large Latino population, there’s the bus stop shelter with a giant red pushpin sculpture piercing the roof and the Spanish phrase “estamos aquí” (“we are here”) emblazoned across it.

And in Coldstream Homestead Montebello, near Lake Montebello, an installation of whimsical windmills designed by local artists Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn, and fabricated by Michael Hart, is generating excitement.

“It’s a boon to us to be able to reach individuals who may have otherwise just overlooked the community,” says the community organization’s executive director, Mark Washington.

Steven Gondol, executive director of Live Baltimore, a nonprofit that facilitates home buying in the city, agrees, saying such projects are both savvy and inspiring.

“When a neighborhood welcomes you with art, it shows that the community is organized and that residents care about their surroundings,” he notes. “In many ways, that’s the most beautiful part.”





You May Also Like


Arts District

Black Musicians Write the Soundtrack of the City

Consider these Baltimore artists essential listening.

Arts District

The Big Baltimore Playlist: April 2020

With concerts canceled due to coronavirus, here are 10 local songs to download now.

MaxSpace

Are Drive-Ins the Theaters of the Future?

The folks at Bengies sure hope so.


Arts District

Roundtable: With Many Funds Exhausted, What’s Next for the Arts Community?

Creative leaders gather to discuss artist relief, pivoting programming, and existing resources.

Arts & Culture

Book Reviews: May 2020

The latest reads from Mary Rizzo and K.M. Szpara

Arts & Culture

Cherry on Top

A wacky Charm City mainstay celebrates 40 years.

Clockwise from left: Katey Truhn, Mark Washington, Jessie Unterhalter, and Michael Hart. -Photography by Mitro Hood

Connect With Us

Most Read


Lamenting a Spring Without The Orioles: What we miss most when the game goes away,

Grocery Workers Manage to Keep Morale High and Give Back Despite Long Hours: Managers and employees are working in overdrive to keep communities fed.

Maryland Hoops, and Everyone Else, Stomachs A Sudden End to Their Seasons: Plus, an update on Trey Mancini’s health and Joe Flacco shows for Marshal Yanda’s retirement party

How to Support Small Businesses Amid Pandemic Panic: As foot traffic slows due to coronavirus, owners worry about lasting impacts.

Teachers Continue to Fight for Education Equality While Instructing Virtually: Despite a lack of resources, students and teachers work to find feasible solutions.