The Chatter

Waterfront Partnership Expands to Fells Point

The nonprofit promises to improve safety and cleanliness of the waterfront neighborhood.

By Michelle Evans | September 19, 2017, 4:59 pm

The Chatter

Waterfront Partnership Expands to Fells Point

The nonprofit promises to improve safety and cleanliness of the waterfront neighborhood.

By Michelle Evans | September 19, 2017, 4:59 pm

Beginning on January 1, 2018, visitors to Fells Point will notice cleaner streets, security patrol, and a few newly planted shrubs as they stroll down Broadway. As a part of Waterfront Partnership’s mission to create a “cleaner, greener future” for Baltimore, it has expanded its reach to one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods.

Waterfront Management Authority (WMA)—a business improvement district under the umbrella of Waterfront Partnership—provides maintenance, beautification, and security waterfront locations Harbor East, Harbor Point, and the Inner Harbor and will now do the same for Fells Point. 

“This big expansion really addresses some of the root problems in Fells Point, like safety and cleanliness,” said Nick Johnson, president of Fells Point Main Street Association (FPMSA) and owner of Su Casa. “It demonstrates that the neighborhood is headed in a new direction.”

About a year ago, Fells Point business leaders initially wanted to develop a plan to address the rising concerns. But they knew the issues were too big to tackle without outside assistance. 

“We needed to join and work with the local government to get where we wanted to be,” said Kelley Heuisler, owner of Poppy & Stella and president of Fells Point District. “It’s been proven that, in Baltimore, having these private-public partnerships is successful. It is a way to really expand upon the services individual communities need and Fells Point is certainly no exception to that.”

After vetting all possible options, FPMSA decided that working with Waterfront Partnership made the most sense—citing the success of WMA’s placement in Harbor East and Harbor Point. 

In order to make the expansion possible, Councilman Zeke Cohen and Councilman Eric Costello introduced a bill to the city council in May, which would allow WMA to expand its boundaries to include commercial properties in Fells Point. 

After the required hearings, the bill was passed and signed by Mayor Catherine Pugh in August and, then, 58 percent of Fells Point property owners needed to agree on the expansion. With 79 percent of the votes in support, Waterfront Partnership was able to move forward with the plan.

Although the majority of business and property owners in Fells Point support the expansion, the increase in annual tax bills was a factor for the opposition. Johnson estimates that the taxes for Su Casa may increase to roughly $2500 a year, but sees it as an investment for the long term.

“No one likes to have taxes or fees imposed,” said Waterfront Partnership executive director Laurie Schwartz. “At the end of the day, I believe the owners saw that the services they receive are well worth the amount they’ll pay. They’ll need the additional services to remain a competitive neighborhood in the city.”

Some business owners also believe that the city should be responsible for providing a safe, clean place for residents to visit and seeking outside sources to fulfill those needs should not be necessary.

“You can’t argue with that—it’s absolutely, 100-percent true,” Johnson said. “Yes, we shouldn’t have to pay above and beyond what we are already paying in taxes, but we have to think of it as an investment in our neighborhood.”

Although the expansion is focused on the commercial portion of Fells Point, some residents with homes within neighborhood boundaries will benefit from the improvements. Schwartz said that some have even gone so far as to call Waterfront Partnership to offer financial contributions for the expansion.

“This expansion is about giving the people that come a better experience,” Heuisler said. “We’re all very excited about what this means overall for Fells Point—it’s going to be huge.”




Meet The Author

Michelle Harris is the digital content producer for Baltimore, where she covers news, community, sports, and beauty.



You May Also Like



News & Community

Hotel Revival Becomes An Emergency Response Center in Mt. Vernon

The hotel's community outreach takes on a new meaning during the pandemic.

News & Community

A World of Difference

What will the “new normal” look like in the COVID-19 era?


Travel & Outdoors

Talk of the Bay

Potomac-Chesapeake Dolphin Project surveys dolphins in about 14 square miles of the Potomac.

The Chatter

Early Risers Turn to Skateboarding as a Pandemic Pastime

Group of guys in their 30s and 40s spend mornings skating in Hampden’s Roosevelt Park.

The Chatter

Boxer Yahu Blackwell Is An All-Everything Businessman

The 33-year-old Baltimore native is the owner of the new Rita’s Italian Ice in Hampden.

Connect With Us

Most Read


How the Orioles Are Preparing for a “Pandemic Season”: Staying apart is the new team bonding experience.

Amid The Economic Chaos, Downtown Partnership’s New President Has a Plan: Shelonda Stokes was just named president after serving in an interim leadership role.

The Womanist Reader Creates an Online Library of Black Literature: A Baltimore writer curates an evolving list of women writers for her women followers.

Boxer Yahu Blackwell Is An All-Everything Businessman: The 33-year-old Baltimore native is the owner of the new Rita’s Italian Ice in Hampden.

Design for Distancing Competition Aims to Revive The Beauty of Public Spaces: Forward-thinking social-distancing structures could be built in the city as early as this month.