Arts District

Snail Mail and JPEGMAFIA to Play Firefly Music Festival in 2019

The multi-day music festival returns to Dover, Delaware, next June.

By Lydia Woolever | December 11, 2018, 1:41 pm

Snail Mail. -Michael Lavine
Arts District

Snail Mail and JPEGMAFIA to Play Firefly Music Festival in 2019

The multi-day music festival returns to Dover, Delaware, next June.

By Lydia Woolever | December 11, 2018, 1:41 pm

Snail Mail. -Michael Lavine

Over the last six years, the most unlikely of venues—the Dover International Speedway and its surrounding woods—has evolved into one of the East Coast’s most popular music festivals, with music lovers from near and far flocking to the Delaware state capital to see their favorite bands at the Firefly Music Festival.

Launched in the summer of 2012, Firefly now draws thousands of attendees and big-name acts such as last year’s The Killers, SZA, and Kendrick Lamar. And next summer, when the festival returns for its seventh year on June 21-23, the three-day affair will feature an equally impressive lineup.

Just announced, headliners will include pop-punk band Panic At The Disco!, indie darlings Death Cab For Cutie and Vampire Weekend, electronic producers Zedd and Kygo, and rappers Travis Scott, Post Malone, and Tyler the Creator. Also on the bill are ’90s R&B legends TLC and D.C.’s own Jukebox the Ghost.

Most notably, though, are the lineup’s three Baltimore acts: rising indie rock star Snail Mail, hip-hop provocateur JPEGMAFIA, and up-and-coming rapper Rakeem Miles. All three artists are set to perform during the Saturday set.



Both Snail Mail’s Lindsey Jordan and JPEGMAFIA’s Barrington Hendricks have had record years, dropping their debut full-length albums (Lush and Veteran respectably), receiving rave reviews from Billboard to Rolling Stone, and landing on a litany of end-of-year lists by the country’s top taste makers. Meanwhile, Miles has gained a loyal following in his new home in L.A. and is in talks with major record labels.

Weekend passes start at $279 and go on sale Friday via fireflyfestival.com.





Meet The Author

Lydia Woolever is senior editor at Baltimore, where she covers people, food, music, and the Chesapeake Bay.



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