The Chatter

Baltimoreans React to Monument Lighting

Demonstrators impact Mount Vernon's annual holiday tradition.

By Jess Mayhugh | December 5, 2014, 12:39 pm

The Chatter

Baltimoreans React to Monument Lighting

Demonstrators impact Mount Vernon's annual holiday tradition.

By Jess Mayhugh | December 5, 2014, 12:39 pm

The Washington Monument lighting has been going strong for 43 years now. Something that started out as a group of neighborhood carolers has now evolved into a city-wide tradition with celebrities, fireworks, and thousands of revelers.

Last night, amidst that crowd were more than 100 protestors who marched from the Inner Harbor to Mount Vernon, prompted by the grand jury's decision yesterday not to indict Officer Daniel Pantaleo in the death of Eric Garner. This, of course, was on the heels of a similar ruling in the Michael Brown case.

The Christmas lights on the monument were lit 25 minutes early and the fireworks ceremony was cut short, as The Sun reported this morning, because of the protestors.

"The protesters were very peaceful and very cordial, but they were making it hard to hear what was happening at the front," Mike Evitts of Downtown Partnership told The Sun. "Ultimately, we decided to shorten the program, because you just don't know what could happen."

Being a member of the crowd last night, we heard mixed reactions about the demonstrators' impact on the lighting: some were upset, some were inspired, and some (due to the sped-up schedule) missed the lighting altogether.

We compiled Baltimoreans' various reactions on social media to portray what the monument lighting was like last night—from a multitude of perspectives.




Meet The Author

Jess Mayhugh is the digital editor for Baltimore, where she covers nightlife, sports, food, and events.



You May Also Like



The Chatter

Design for Distancing Competition Aims to Revive The Beauty of Public Spaces

Forward-thinking social-distancing structures could be built in the city as early as this month.

The Chatter

Five Things to Know About Democratic Mayoral Nominee Brandon Scott

The 36-year-old City Council President rallies past Sheila Dixon to win Democratic mayoral primary.


The Chatter

How to Celebrate Juneteenth While Social Distancing

Local museums, businesses, and community institutions are offering plenty of ways to celebrate safely.

The Chatter

Black Mothers, Daughters, and Aunties: A Collective Sigh Over 2020’s Unrest

Black women weigh in on the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery.

The Chatter

Baltimore City Joins Other School Districts in Online-Only Fall Start

District follows similar decisions in other areas amid once-again rising COVID-19 cases.

Connect With Us

Most Read


Boxer Yahu Blackwell Is An All-Everything Businessman: The 33-year-old Baltimore native is the owner of the new Rita’s Italian Ice in Hampden.

How These Surprise Quarantine ‘Flower Bombs’ Are Helping Families in Need: The paper-plate flowers have become a massive fundraiser for the Ronald McDonald House.

Design for Distancing Competition Aims to Revive The Beauty of Public Spaces: Forward-thinking social-distancing structures could be built in the city as early as this month.

Amid The Economic Chaos, Downtown Partnership’s New President Has a Plan: Shelonda Stokes was just named president after serving in an interim leadership role.

Five Things to Know About Democratic Mayoral Nominee Brandon Scott: The 36-year-old City Council President rallies past Sheila Dixon to win Democratic mayoral primary.