In Good Taste

We Preview Baltimore City and County Restaurant Weeks

City waives fee for restaurants, while county event has more dining options than ever.

By Rachel Drachman | July 7, 2015, 5:19 pm

-Courtesy of Linwoods
In Good Taste

We Preview Baltimore City and County Restaurant Weeks

City waives fee for restaurants, while county event has more dining options than ever.

By Rachel Drachman | July 7, 2015, 5:19 pm

-Courtesy of Linwoods

In an effort to help the city’s restaurants, which took a hit this April due to the citywide curfew, Downtown Partnership of Baltimore waived the fees restaurants have to pay to be a part of the Summer Restaurant Week (July 24-August 2).

“We’ve heard from restaurants that said the unrest in the spring really hurt,” says Michael Evitts, Downtown Partnership vice president of communications. “Many are still trying to recover.”

The Brewer’s Art is one of hundreds of city restaurants thankful for the waived fee. “It’s an absolutely wonderful thing,” says Volker Stewart, co-owner of the Mt. Vernon beer bar, whose Restaurant Week menu will include steak frites, salmon, and chicken. Brewer’s will also be offering upgrades to the fixed menu, including lamb neck and tilefish, each for a $7 supplement. “We want to give people more options if they want to explore outside of the Restaurant Week menu,” he says.

Bryan Voltaggio's Power Plant restaurant Aggio will be participating in the summer Restaurant Week for the first time with a menu including Day Boat scallops over Carolina gold rice risotto, and chicken with charred rabe. Waterfront Mexican joint Barcocina will be serving up a new lunch menu especially for Restaurant Week. The specifics of the menu are not yet finalized, but this Fells Point staple is remaining positive about the turn out. “It will be good for the city,” says general manager Mike Donovan. “But it depends on how much tourism comes back after what happened.”

Up north in the county, Summer Restaurant Week (July 31-August 15) is at an all-time high with 64 participating restaurants, including favorites like Ruth’s Chris, Linwoods, and River Watch in Essex.

“Restaurant Week is a wonderful way to get people out and try a restaurant they may not have tried before,” says River Watch owner Traci Sullivan. River Watch will be offering mostly favorites from its seafood-centric menu.

Sullivan isn’t the only one hoping to attract newcomers. Rachel Maw, executive assistant to Linwood Dame of Linwoods Restaurant, explains that Restaurant Week attracts people who don’t dine out on a regular basis. “It’s done a nice job of bringing together the community during hot summer months when the first thought isn’t going out to dine,” she says.

For Chef Shawn Riley, this will be his first Restaurant Week at Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Pikesville. He will be preparing some Ruth’s Chris classics such as a six-ounce fillet, stuffed chicken breast, and salmon.

“Hopefully, we’ll get them in and wow them, and they’ll come again,” says Riley.




You May Also Like


On The Town

Old Line Spirits Donates Proceeds from New Whiskey to Industry Workers

All profits from the rum-finished whiskey will benefit the Baltimore Restaurant Relief Fund.

Food & Drink

Review: Goldberg's Bagels

Goldberg’s New York Bagels lives up to its name.

Food & Drink

Local Flavor Live Podcast: Despite Shutdowns, Restaurants Remain Resilient

We check in from quarantine about how the local dining scene is faring.


Food & Drink

Three Spring Sips to Celebrate the Return of Warm Rays

Beer, wine, and spirit suggestions to welcome the season.

The Chatter

A Local Hand Sanitizer Factory is Born Out of an Unlikely Collaboration

Local businesses Mount Royal Soap, Charm City Meadworks, and Waverly Color unite to fight coronavirus.

Food & Drink

Mt. Washington Tavern Pours One Out For The Preakness Stakes

Make your own Black-Eyed Susan with tips from owner Rob Frisch.

Connect With Us

Most Read


Art of Baltimore Project Showcases Digital Works Throughout Downtown: Campaign supports local artists while illuminating the city for essential employees.

Teachers Continue to Fight for Education Equality While Instructing Virtually: Despite a lack of resources, students and teachers work to find feasible solutions.

Maryland Hoops, and Everyone Else, Stomachs A Sudden End to Their Seasons: Plus, an update on Trey Mancini’s health and Joe Flacco shows for Marshal Yanda’s retirement party

Frustrated by Trump, Hogan Lands 500,000 COVID-19 Tests from South Korea: First Lady Yumi Hogan helped negotiations with South Korean suppliers.

How to Support Small Businesses Amid Pandemic Panic: As foot traffic slows due to coronavirus, owners worry about lasting impacts.