Wonder Women

Celebrate trailblazers and groundbreaking accomplishments during Women’s History Month.

Kaitlyn Pacheco - March 2019

Wonder Women

Celebrate trailblazers and groundbreaking accomplishments during Women’s History Month.

Kaitlyn Pacheco - March 2019

Robert Lugo ceramic of Lillie May Carroll Jackson. -Walters Art Museum

We spend a lot of time focusing on gender equality issues (gender discrimination, equal pay, and sexual harassment, to name a few), but in honor of Women’s History Month, spend some time looking back at our local and national history and reflect on how women of the past paved the way for future generations of female change-makers.

Women’s History Month at the B&O
March 1-31. Throughout Women’s History Month, visit this downtown museum to learn about the history of women’s involvement in the railroad industry and how they helped to construct the B&O Railroad. B&O Railroad Museum, 901 W. Pratt St. Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free.

Conjure Woman: Faith Healers, Hoodoo, and Spirituality
March 2. Spend the afternoon exploring the history of conjure women in the black community, featuring a discussion and lecture about the roots of the mystical tradition. The Reginald F. Lewis Museum, 830 E. Pratt St. 1 p.m. Free-$8.

Celebrating Lillie May Carroll Jackson
March 7. In a partnership with the Walters Art Museum and Morgan State University, ceramic works by Robert Lugo featuring portraits of prominent Baltimore civil rights leader Lillie May Carroll Jackson and her daughter Juanita Jackson Mitchell will be on display at 1 West Mount Vernon Place. Attend this special talk to hear from experts at the Walters about the life and legacy of these two women. Lillie May Carroll Jackson Museum, 1320 Eutaw Pl. 6:30-7:15 p.m. Free.

Women Artists in Antiquity
March 10. Hear Patrick Crowley, assistant professor of art history at the University of Chicago, give a thought-provoking lecture about contributions from female artists of antiquity. The Walters Art Museum, 600 N. Charles St. 2-3:30 p.m. Free.

Maryland Women Through History
March 15. Presented by the Maryland Historical Society, this afternoon program examines the lives of historical local women from colonial times through the 20th century, with a special emphasis on Baltimore socialite Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte. Enoch Pratt Free Library, 1303 Orleans St. 1 p.m. Free.

Women of the Wine World
March 28. Learn about how the centuries-old world of wine was shaped by women, and take notes on prominent female winemakers who continue to produce some of the most sought-after bottles of reds and whites. Bin 604, 604 S. Exeter St. 6-8 p.m. $10.

Women in Maryland
March 31. From spies and detectives to suffragists, local author Lauren Silberman will share her research on some of the Old Line State’s most noteworthy women. B&O Ellicott City Station Museum, 3711 Maryland Ave., Ellicott City. 3 p.m. $12.





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